Create high quality barcodes online (35 different formats, free download as bitmap & vector)

Generate printable and scannable barcodes with this free online barcode generator. Download your barcode in PNG or SVG format to include in your documents, labels or prints.

Instantly generate your barcodes, without any software installation. Linear barcodes, 2D Codes, QR Codes, Postal Barcodes, EAN, UPC, GS1 DataBar, Code-128, Data Matrix, PDF417, ISBN and many more!

Just fill in the content and select the format/type you want your barcode to have below. Generate, instantly see the result, and download for free.

CODE 128 Subset A (ASCII 00 to 95 [0–9, A–Z and control codes] + special characters) [C128A]


“012345ABCDEF%$#” as C128A

128A (Code Set A) – ASCII characters 00 to 95 (0–9, A–Z and control codes), special characters, and FNC 1–4. - To represent all 128 ASCII values, it shifts among three code sets (A, B, C). Together, code sets A and B cover all 128 ASCII characters. Code set C is used to efficiently encode digit strings.

CODE 128 Subset B (ASCII 32 to 127 [0–9, A–Z, a–z] + special characters) [C128B]


“012345abc DEF%$#” as C128B

128B (Code Set B) – ASCII characters 32 to 127 (0–9, A–Z, a–z), special characters, and FNC 1–4. - To represent all 128 ASCII values, it shifts among three code sets (A, B, C). Together, code sets A and B cover all 128 ASCII characters. Code set C is used to efficiently encode digit strings.

CODE 128 Subset C ([00–99], encodes two digits with a single code point) [C128C]


“00112233445566778899” as C128C

128C (Code Set C) – 00–99 (encodes two digits with a single code point) and FNC1. - To represent all 128 ASCII values, it shifts among three code sets (A, B, C). Together, code sets A and B cover all 128 ASCII characters. Code set C is used to efficiently encode digit strings.

CODE 128 ([0–9, 00-99, A–Z, a–z] + special characters) [C128]


“0123456789abc DEF%$#” as C128

Code 128 is a high-density linear barcode symbology defined in ISO/IEC 15417:2007. It is used for alphanumeric or numeric-only barcodes. It can encode all 128 characters of ASCII and, by use of an extension symbol (FNC4), the Latin-1 characters defined in ISO/IEC 8859-1. GS1-128 (formerly known as UCC/EAN-128) is a subset of Code 128 and is used extensively worldwide in shipping and packaging industries as a product identification code for the container and pallet levels in the supply chain.

CODE 39 + CHECKSUM (Code 39 mod 43) [C39E+]


“012345-.ABC def$%” as C39E+

Code 39 with an optional modulo 43 check digit (requires checksum feature to be enabled in the barcode reader).

CODE 39 ANSI MH10.8M-1983 / USD-3 / Code 3 of 9 / Alpha39 / Type 39 / USS Code 39 (A-Z, a-z, 0-9, -, ., and space (+ control ‘*’), extended with $, /, +, %) [C39E]


“012345-.ABC def$%” as C39E

The Code 39 specification defines 42 characters, consisting of uppercase letters (A through Z), numeric digits (0 through 9) and a number of special characters (-, ., $, /, +, %, and space). An additional character (denoted ‘*’) is used for both start and stop delimiters. Code 39 barcodes are used in many industries and is the standard for many U.S. government barcode specifications, including the Department of Defense.

CODE 39 CLASSIC + CHECKSUM (Code 39 classic mod 43) [C39+]


“012345-.ABC def” as C39+

Code 39 CLASSIC with an optional modulo 43 check digit (requires checksum feature to be enabled in the barcode reader).

CODE 39 CLASSIC (A-Z, a-z, 0-9, -, ., and space (+ control ‘*’)) [C39]


“012345-.ABCdef” as C39

The first specification of code 39 defined 39 characters, consisting of uppercase letters (A through Z), numeric digits (0 through 9) and a number of special characters (-, ., and space). An additional character (denoted ‘*’) is used for both start and stop delimiters. Code 39 barcodes are used in many industries and is the standard for many U.S. government barcode specifications, including the Department of Defense.

CODE 93 - USS-93 ([0–9, 00-99, A–Z, a–z] + special characters) [C93]


“012345-.ABC def$%” as C93

Code 93 is designed to encode the same 26 upper case letters, 10 digits and 7 special characters as code 39. In addition to 43 characters, Code 93 defines 5 special characters (including a start/stop character), which can be combined with other characters to unambiguously represent all 128 ASCII characters. Code 93 was designed in 1982 by Intermec to provide a higher density and data security enhancement to Code 39. Code 93 is used primarily by Canada Post to encode supplementary delivery information.

CODABAR Codeabar, Ames Code, NW-7, Monarch, Code 2 of 7, Rationalized Codabar, ANSI/AIM BC3-1995 or USD-4 (0–9, -, $, ,:, /, +, .) [CODABAR]


“0123456789” as CODABAR

Codabar was designed to be accurately read even when printed on dot-matrix printers for multi-part forms such as FedEx airbills and blood bank forms, where variants are still in use as of 2007. Although newer symbologies hold more information in a smaller space, Codabar has a large installed base in libraries. It is even possible to print Codabar codes using typewriter-like impact printers, which allows the creation of many codes with consecutive numbers without having to use computer equipment. After each printed code, the printer's stamp is mechanically turned to the next number, as for example in mechanical mile counters.

CODE 11 (0–9, -) [CODE11]


“0123456789” as CODE11

Code 11 is a barcode symbology developed by Intermec in 1977. It is used primarily in telecommunications. The symbol can encode any length string consisting of the digits 0–9 and the dash character (-). A twelfth code represents the start/stop character, commonly printed as "*".

EAN 13 European/International Article Number (12 digits + 1 check digit) [EAN13]


“0123456789” as EAN13

The International Article Number (also known as European Article Number or EAN) is a standard describing a barcode symbology and numbering system used in global trade to identify a specific retail product type, in a specific packaging configuration, from a specific manufacturer. The standard has been subsumed in the Global Trade Item Number standard from the GS1 organization; the same numbers can be referred to as GTINs and can be encoded in other barcode symbologies defined by GS1. EAN barcodes are used worldwide for lookup at retail point of sale, but can also be used as numbers for other purposes such as wholesale ordering or accounting. The most commonly used EAN standard is the thirteen-digit EAN-13, a superset of the original 12-digit Universal Product Code (UPC-A) standard. An EAN-13 number includes a 3-digit GS1 prefix (indicating country of registration or special type of product). A prefix with a first digit of "0" indicates a 12-digit UPC-A code follows. A prefix with first two digits of "45" or "49" indicates a Japanese Article Number (JAN) follows.

EAN 2-Digits UPC-Based Extension (2 digits) [EAN2]


“12” as EAN2

2-digit EAN-2 supplemental barcode, placed on the right-hand side of EAN-13 or UPC. Generally used for periodicals like magazines or books to indicate the current year’s issue number.

EAN 5-Digits UPC-Based Extension (5 digits) [EAN5]


“50495” as EAN5

5-digit EAN-5 supplemental barcode, placed on the right-hand side of EAN-13 or UPC. Generally used for weighed products like food, to indicate the manufacturer’s suggested retail price. The first digit represents currency: 5 for US$/USD, 6 for CA$/CAD, 4 for NZ$/NZD, 3 for AU$/AUD, 0 & 1 for £/GBP

EAN 8 (8 digits) [EAN8]


“1234567” as EAN8

EAN-8 is derived from the longer International Article Number (EAN-13) code. It was introduced for use on small packages where an EAN-13 barcode would be too large; for example on cigarettes, pencils, and chewing gum packets. It is encoded identically to the 12 digits of the UPC-A barcode, except that it has 4 (rather than 6) digits in each of the left and right halves. EAN-8 barcodes may be used to encode GTIN-8 (8-digit Global Trade Identification Numbers) which are product identifiers from the GS1 System. A GTIN-8 begins with a 2- or 3-digit GS1 prefix (which is assigned to each national GS1 authority) followed by a 5- or 4-digit item reference element depending on the length of the GS1 prefix), and a checksum digit. EAN-8 codes are common throughout the world, and companies may also use them to encode RCN-8 (8-digit Restricted Circulation Numbers), and use them to identify own-brand products sold only in their stores. RCN-8 are a subset of GTIN-8 which begin with a first digit of 0 or 2.

ITF Interleaved 2 of 5 + CHECKSUM CODE 25, I2OF5, ITF, I25 (9-0) [I25+]


“0123456789” as I25+

Interleaved 2 of 5 with a checksum added as last digit, which is calculated in the same way as UPC checksums. Identcode and Leitcode are variants of interleaved 2 of 5 with check digits used by Deutsche Post.

ITF Interleaved 2 of 5 CODE 25, I2OF5, ITF, I25 (9-0) [I25]


“0123456789” as I25

Interleaved 2 of 5 (ITF) is used commercially on 135 film, for ITF-14 barcodes, and on cartons of some products, while the products inside are labeled with UPC or EAN. ITF encodes pairs of digits; the first digit is encoded in the five bars (or black lines), while the second digit is encoded in the five spaces (or white lines) interleaved with them. Two out of every five bars or spaces are wide (hence exactly 2 of 5). Because digits are encoded by pairs, only an even number of digits can be encoded. Typically an odd number of digits is encoded by adding a "0" as first digit, but sometimes an odd number of digits is encoded by using five narrow spaces in the last digit.

IMB - Intelligent Mail barcode Onecode/USPS-B-3200/4CB/4-CB/USPS4CB [IMB]


“01234567094987654321-01234567891” as IMB

The Intelligent Mail Barcode (IM barcode) is a 65-bar barcode for use on mail in the United States. The term "Intelligent Mail" refers to services offered by the United States Postal Service for domestic mail delivery. The IM barcode is intended to provide greater information and functionality than its predecessors POSTNET and PLANET. An Intelligent Mail barcode has also been referred to as a One Code Solution and a 4-State Customer Barcode, abbreviated 4CB, 4-CB or USPS4CB. The complete specification can be found in USPS Document USPS-B-3200.[1] It effectively incorporates the routing ZIP code and tracking information included in previously used postal barcode standards.

IMB - Intelligent Mail Barcode pre-processed Onecode/USPS-B-3200/4CB/4-CB/USPS4CB [IMBPRE]


“AADTFFDFTDADTAADAATFDTDDAAADDTDTTDAFADADDDTFFFDDTTTADFAAADFTDAADA” as IMBPRE

Up to 65 vertical bars described as four distinct symbols: "T" (tracker), "A" (ascender), "D" (descender), "F" (full bar).

KIX - PostNL PostNL Klant IndeX code voor machinaal lezen van adressen [KIX]


“0123456789” as KIX

A slightly modified version of Royal Mail 4-State Customer Code (CBC) called KIX which stands for Klant index (Customer index). It differs from CBC in that it doesn't use the start and end symbols or the checksum, separates the house number and suffixes with an X, and is placed below the address. -- De code beschrijft een Nederlands adres. De eerste zes series staan voor de postcode. Daarna volgt het huis- of postbus- of antwoordnummer van maximaal vijf cijfers. Als het huisnummer een toevoeging heeft dan volgt een X en de toevoeging van maximaal zes tekens. Streepjes, spaties en dergelijke worden niet opgenomen in de KIX-code. Het huisnummer 56-28 wordt in de KIX-code gerepresenteerd als 56X28, huisnummer 56c als 56XC.

MSI + CHECKSUM (Plessey modified) + CHECKSUM (modulo 11) (9-0) [MSI+]


“0123456789” as MSI+

Plessey Code with a modulo 11 check code

MSI Variation of Plessey code, Plessey modified (9-0) [MSI]


“0123456789” as MSI

Plessey Code is a 1D linear barcode symbology based on pulse width modulation, developed in 1971 by The Plessey Company plc, a British-based company. It is one of the first barcode symbology, and is still used in some rare libraries and for shelf tags in retail stores, in part as a solution to their internal requirement for stock control.

PHARMACODE TWO-TRACKS Double-track Pharmaceutical Binary Code, Two-track Laetus Code (single integer from 4 to 64570080) [PHARMA2T]


“0123456789” as PHARMA2T

PHARMA-CODE - Two-Track is typically used for in-house inventory control and security verification, ensuring that packaging materials and contents match and are correct. It is not used for point-of-sale purchases.

PHARMACODE Laetus code, single-track Pharmaceutical Binary Code (single integer from 3 to 131070) [PHARMA]


“0123456789” as PHARMA

Pharmacode, also known as Pharmaceutical Binary Code, is a barcode standard, used in the pharmaceutical industry as a packing control system. It is designed to be readable despite printing errors. It can be printed in multiple colors as a check to ensure that the remainder of the packaging (which the pharmaceutical company must print to protect itself from legal liability) is correctly printed.

PLANET (PostaL Alpha Numeric Encoding Technique) [PLANET]


“0123456789” as PLANET

The Postal Alpha Numeric Encoding Technique (PLANET) barcode was used by the United States Postal Service to identify and track pieces of mail during delivery - the Post Office's "CONFIRM" services. It was fully superseded by Intelligent Mail Barcode by January 28, 2013.

POSTNET (Postal Numeric Encoding Technique) [POSTNET]


“0123456789” as POSTNET

POSTNET (Postal Numeric Encoding Technique) is a barcode symbology used by the United States Postal Service to assist in directing mail. The ZIP Code or ZIP+4 code is encoded in half- and full-height bars. Most often, the delivery point is added, usually being the last two digits of the address or PO box number.

RM4SCC (Royal Mail 4-State Customer Code) [RMS4CC]


“0123456789” as RMS4CC

RM4SCC (Royal Mail 4-State Customer Code is used for the Royal Mail Cleanmail service. It enables UK postcodes as well as Delivery Point Suffixes (DPSs) to be easily read by a machine at high speed. This barcode is known as CBC (Customer Bar Code) within Royal Mail.

Standard 2 of 5 + CHECKSUM (IATA) (9-0) [S25+]


“0123456789” as S25+

IATA/Standard 2 of 5 with an optional check digit that is based on the modulo 10 (mod 10) algorithm. A more efficient implement of Standard 2 of 5 is the newer Interleaved 2 of 5 (ITF + CHECKSUM).

Standard 2 of 5 (IATA) (9-0) [S25]


“0123456789” as S25

Standard/IATA 2 of 5has been used by the International Air Transport Association (IATA) for the processing of airline cargo. The spaces in a Standard 2 of 5 symbol are fixed-width, so that only the bars are used to encode information. The "2 of 5" name derives from the fact that of the five bars that are used to encode each character, two are wide and three are narrow. A more efficient implement of Standard 2 of 5 is the newer Interleaved 2 of 5 (ITF).

UPC (UPC-A) Universal Product Code (12 digits) [UPCA]


“72527273070” as UPCA

UPC (technically refers to UPC-A) consists of 12 numeric digits that are uniquely assigned to each trade item. Along with the related EAN barcode, the UPC is the barcode mainly used for scanning of trade items at the point of sale, per GS1 specifications.[1] UPC data structures are a component of GTINs and follow the global GS1 specification, which is based on international standards. But some retailers (clothing, furniture) do not use the GS1 system (rather other barcode symbologies or article number systems). On the other hand, some retailers use the EAN/UPC barcode symbology, but without using a GTIN (for products sold in their own stores only).

UPC-E Universal Product Code (6 digits) [UPCE]


“725277” as UPCE

To allow the use of UPC barcodes on smaller packages, where a full 12-digit barcode may not fit, a ‘zero-suppressed’ version of UPC was developed, called UPC-E, in which the number system digit, all trailing zeros in the manufacturer code, and all leading zeros in the product code, are suppressed (omitted).

Aztec Code Data Matrix 2D barcode (ISO/IEC 24778:2008) [AZTEC]


“Aztec Code 0123456789 $%&” as AZTEC

Aztec Code is supposed to produce readable codes with various printer technologies. It is also well suited for displays of cell phones and other mobile devices. It is named after the resemblance of the central finder pattern to an Aztec pyramid, Aztec code has the potential to use less space than other matrix barcodes because it does not require a surrounding blank "quiet zone".

DATAMATRIX Data Matrix barcode (ISO/IEC 16022:2006) [DATAMATRIX]


“DataMatrix barcode 0123456789 $%&” as DATAMATRIX

A Data Matrix is a two-dimensional code consisting of black and white "cells" or dots arranged in either a square or rectangular pattern, also known as a matrix. The information to be encoded can be text or numeric data. Usual data size is from a few bytes up to 1556 bytes. The length of the encoded data depends on the number of cells in the matrix. Error correction codes are often used to increase reliability: even if one or more cells are damaged so it is unreadable, the message can still be read. A Data Matrix symbol can store up to 2,335 alphanumeric characters.

PDF417 Portable Data File 2D barcode (ISO/IEC 15438:2006) [PDF417]


“ISO/IEC 15438:2006 0123456789 $%&” as PDF417

PDF417 is a stacked linear barcode format used in a variety of applications such as transport, identification cards, and inventory management. "PDF" stands for Portable Data File. It is one of the formats (along with Data Matrix) that can be used to print postage accepted by the United States Postal Service and is also used by the airline industry’s Bar Coded Boarding Pass (BCBP) standard as the 2D bar code symbolism for paper boarding passes. PDF417 is the standard selected by the Department of Homeland Security as the machine readable zone technology for RealID compliant driver licenses and state issued identification cards. PDF417 barcodes are also included on visas and border crossing cards issued by the State of Israel.

QR-CODE Quick Response code 2D barcode [QRCODE]


“Quick Response code 2D barcode 0123456789 !#$%” as QRCODE

QR codes are used in a broad context, including both commercial tracking applications and convenience-oriented applications aimed at mobile-phone users (termed mobile tagging). QR codes may be used to display text to the user, to add a vCard contact to the user’s device, to open a Uniform Resource Identifier (URI), to connect to a wireless network, or to compose an email or text message. The QR code has become one of the most-used types of two-dimensional code.

NOTES: This tool uses various open-source libraries and is provided as-is. It is your responsibility to check and verify the generated barcode before using it (for example using a scanner-app on your smartphone). To use a barcode within the global supply chain you need a prefix to be allocated to you by a registration authority.


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